Lovato: I can’t drink responsibly

Demi Lovato

Demi Lovato feels she has “lost the privilege” to drink.

The 21-year-old star checked into rehab in 2010 to overcome issues with bulimia and self-harming and she’s also admitted to a struggle with alcohol and drugs.

Although she continues her friendship with 20-year-old Miley Cyrus, who openly endorses the use of substances such as marijuana, Demi is adamant she won’t join in.

“Some people can smoke and drink recreationally,” she reasoned to British magazine OK!

“I’m not one of those people. If I do that, it will spiral out of control very quickly. I’ve lost the privilege of being able to drink responsibly.”

Demi has even published a book titled Staying Strong 365 Days a Year, which she hopes will help fans going through a hard time.

The star would help her pal Miley should she every struggle with similar issues.

“She is doing her thing and having fun. I’m in no position to say to her, ‘I’m worried about you.’ I’m just focused on my own journey,” she explained.

“I will always be there for my friends but I am in no position to criticize anyone for smoking weed or drinking because it’s their journey.”

Demi has been very open about her battle and shows her emotions often.

She hopes this well help her stay strong as well as others going through the same thing.

“When I feel like I want to give up I think to myself, ‘What about the 17-year-old girl that’s been free of self-harming for nine months?’ If I gave up my sobriety that would mean it would be OK for her to go back to self-harming,” she said.

Demi recently opened up about how bad her addiction got.

She admitted to “smuggling” cocaine onto flights to curb her cravings and to drinking vodka in the mornings.

“Something I’ve never talked about before, but with my drug use I could hide it to where I would sneak drugs. I couldn’t go without 30 minutes to an hour without cocaine and I would bring it on airplanes,” she revealed to Access Hollywood.

“I would smuggle it basically and just wait until everyone in first class would go to sleep and I would do it right there. I’d sneak to the bathroom and I’d do it. That’s how difficult it got and that was even with somebody [with me], I had a sober companion, somebody who was watching me 24/7 and living with me [and] I was able to hide it from them as well.”

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